Last edited by Gagrel
Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

5 edition of Patriarchal structures in Shakespeare"s drama found in the catalog.

Patriarchal structures in Shakespeare"s drama

by Peter Erickson

  • 312 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by University of California Press in Berkeley .
Written in English

    Places:
  • England
    • Subjects:
    • Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Political and social views.,
    • Literature and society -- England -- History -- 16th century.,
    • Social structure in literature.,
    • Patriarchy in literature.,
    • Sex role in literature.,
    • Men in literature.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementPeter Erickson.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsPR3024 .E7 1985
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxii, 209 p. ;
      Number of Pages209
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2838828M
      ISBN 100520048067
      LC Control Number84000601

      Patriarchal Structures in Shakespeare’s Drama (Berkeley: University of California Press, ). Reprinted in: As You Like It (New York: New American Library, ), ;. Leonard Digges refers to Will Shakespeare as England's Lope de Vega for sonnet-writing, in an inscription about James Mabbe's sending Vega's Rimas () to Will Baker. In the flyleaf of the book he wrote to Will Baker.

      Erickson, Peter. “Sexual Politics and Social Structure in As You Like It. ” In Patriarchal Structures in Shakespeare’s Drama, pp. 15– Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, Peter Erickson, currently in his fifth year as Visiting Professor of Humanities at Williams College, is the author of Patriarchal Structures in Shakespeare's Drama (California, ), Rewriting Shakespeare, Rewriting Ourselves (California, ), and Citing Shakespeare: The Reinterpretation of Race in Contemporary Literature and Art (Palgrave, ).

      Shakespeare studies have of course been affected by these debates. ‘Shakespeare and Sexuality’ was the topic of the twenty-fifth Interna-tional Shakespeare conference at Stratford-upon-Avon in August , and this volume includes several of the papers delivered at the confer-ence. It also includes relevant essays from other volumes of. William Shakespeare - William Shakespeare - Shakespeare’s sources: With a few exceptions, Shakespeare did not invent the plots of his plays. Sometimes he used old stories (Hamlet, Pericles). Sometimes he worked from the stories of comparatively recent Italian writers, such as Giovanni Boccaccio—using both well-known stories (Romeo and Juliet, Much Ado About .


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Patriarchal structures in Shakespeare"s drama by Peter Erickson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Patriarchal Structures in Shakespeare's Drama Hardcover – March 1, by Peter Erickson (Author)Cited by: Carolyn Ruth Swift, "Patriarchal Structures in Shakespeare's Drama. Peter Erickson Love's Argument: Gender Relations in Shakespeare. Marianne L.

Novy," Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Soci no. 1 (Autumn, ): COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

Patriarchal structures in Shakespeare's drama. [Peter Erickson] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare; William Shakespeare: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Peter Erickson.

Find more information about: ISBN: OCLC. Review of Patriarchal Structures in Shakespeare's Plays by Peter Erickson. / Garner, Shirley N. In: Shakespeare Studies, Vol. 19,p. Research output: Contribution to Author: Shirley N Garner.

surely safer to assume that Shakespeare the dramatist, though likely to reflect the assumptions and limitations of his (patriarchal) age and society, is at least as likely to offer a profound criticism of life as enforce an ideology. As this more intelligent and imaginative Shakespeare emerges, so do Erickson's readings of the plays become more.

Peter Erickson (Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute) is author of Patriarchal Structures in Shakespeare's Drama and Rewriting Shakespeare, Rewriting Ourselves, and coeditor of Shakespeare's "Rough Magic": Renaissance Essays in Honor of C. Barber. Shakespeare does write queens and women of high birth.

In the end these women, no matter their personal stories always end up either dead or married to a man, who will keep them under patriarchal control. There are whispers of patriarchy being challenged but women are often then put back in their place. Buy Patriarchal Structures in Shakespeare's Drama by Erickson (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. Patriarchal Structures in Shakespeare's Drama: : Erickson: Books. In Shakespeare’s Hamlet, the role of women can be said to be a reflection of the Elizabethan era.

The portrayal of Ophelia specifically draws on the fact that society during this era was indeed patriarchal. However, there was no official “patriarchal” system.

- Elizabethan society was patriarchal. - Men were considered to be the leaders and women their inferiors. - Women = "weaker sex", both physically and emotionally.

- Constantly 'looked after' by a dominant male. - Social structure of the 16th Century allowed women limited. The patriarchal nature of the social order reinforces and rewards the compliance of women. Ophelia dies by her own hand because she lost her father, for her, the source of both order and authority.

Gertrude dies because she was unwilling to bow to authority. She rejects her role as a woman, destroying herself. Enlisting a broad range of scholarship-traditional and contemporary, psychological, sociological, and feminist-these studies address problems of gender in Shakespeare's plays.

Besides adding to our understanding of the plays, both books deal with the crucial question of Shakespeare's relation to his age-the extent to which he succeeded in moving beyond : Gayle Greene.

Definition: Patriarchal (adj.) describes a general structure in which men have power over women. Society (n.) is the entirety of relations of a community. A patriarchal society consists of a male-dominated power structure throughout organized society and in individual relationships.

Power is related to : Linda Napikoski. Patriarchal Structures in Shakespeare's Drama [includes chs. on AYLI]. U of Calif. P, [recommended] Montrose, Louis Adrian.

"'The Place of a Brother' In As You Like It: Social Process and Comic Form." Shakespeare Quarterly 32 (): [recommended] Traub, V. see above, first section [recommended] Hamlet (see via course Bblearn folder).

Peter Erickson is the author of Patriarchal Structures in Shakespeare's Drama (California, ) and co-editor with Coppélia Kahn of Shakespeare's "Rough Magic": Renaissance Essays in.

William Shakespeare - William Shakespeare - Feminist criticism and gender studies: Feminist and gender-study approaches to Shakespeare criticism made significant gains after Feminists, like New Historicists, were interested in contextualizing Shakespeare’s writings rather than subjecting them to ahistorical formalist analysis.

Turning to anthropologists such as. Peter Erickson, of the Clark Art Institute, is author of Patriarchal Structures in Shakespeare's Drama and Rewriting Shakespeare, Rewriting Ourselves. Clark Hulse is Professor of English and Art History at the University of Illinois at Chicago and author of The Rule of Art: Literature and Painting in the Renaissance.

Peter Erickson is the author of Patriarchal Structures in Shakespeare's Drama (California, ) and co-editor with Coppélia Kahn of Shakespeare's "Rough Magic": Renaissance Essays in Honor of C.

Barber (). He is currently writing the volume on the comedies for Routledge's series, Feminist Readings of by: The book examines the relationship of drama and "secondary drama." It asks to what extent they modify, question, but also enrich each other. The "primary" drama is discussed as a historical form that participates in patriarchal structures of power and violence.

In Shakespeare’s ‘The Taming of the Shrew’, women are shown to be objectified and subservient to men, conforming to the accepted gender roles that are expected of them.

Patriarchal views of femininity support the authority of men in society, as well as subjugation and subordination of women.Peter Erickson is the author of Patriarchal Structures in Shakespeare's Drama () and Rewriting Shakespeare, Rewriting Ourselves () and coeditor of Shakespeare's "Rough Magic": Renaissance Essays in Honor of C.

L. Barber () and Early Modern Visual Culture: Representation, Race, and Empire in Renaissance England (). Maurice Hunt, Research Format: Hardcover. About the Author Peter Erickson is the author of Patriarchal Structures in Shakespeare's Drama (California, ) and co-editor with Coppélia Kahn of Shakespeare's "Rough Magic": Renaissance Essays in Honor of C.

L. Barber (). He is currently writing the volume on the comedies for Routledge's series, Feminist Readings of Shakespeare.